1. Hidden Cameras on the Arizona Border 2: Drugs, Guns and 850 Illegal Aliens

Excerpt: Hidden Cameras on the Arizona Border 2: Drugs, Guns, and 850 Illegal Aliens” is the Center for Immigration Studies’ second web-based film on the impact of illegal alien activity in Arizona. The Center’s first video on the subject, “Hidden Cameras on the Arizona Border: Coyotes, Bears, and Trails,” has received over 50,000 views to date. This new 10-minute mini-documentary raises the bar, featuring footage of both illegal-alien entry as well as gun- and drug-smuggling. At minimum, the inescapable conclusion is that hidden cameras reveal a reality that illegal-alien activity is escalating.

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2. Coverage of Hidden Cameras on the Arizona Border 2

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KSAZ FOX 10 in Phoenix

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3. Mark Krikorian debates Illegal Aliens and Employment

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4. The Medicaid Costs of Legalizing Illegal Aliens

Excerpt: The recently enacted health reform law, in part, expands eligibility for the Medicaid program. Illegal aliens remain ineligible for Medicaid beyond emergency services. However, this could change if they are legalized. This Memorandum estimates the potential Medicaid costs associated with legalization. The costs associated with the new affordability credits for those with income above the Medicaid threshold are not included here, and would be in addition to the extra Medicaid costs.

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5. Suing Arizona

Excerpt: The Obama Justice Department’s lawsuit against Arizona’s new immigration law, S.B. 1070, has been criticized on several grounds: It has no merit, since the measure is consistent with federal law. It is hypocritical, since there are no lawsuits against so-called sanctuary cities, which unlike Arizona are explicitly in violation of federal immigration law. It is premature, since the law doesn’t even go into effect until July 29. It is a political stunt, intended to increase Hispanic turnout in November.

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6. Immigration enforcement must come first: Feds can’t change neglected system overnight

Excerpt: The debate over the new Arizona law – and the lawsuit it has spawned – has thrust immigration back into the national spotlight. It also has reminded us of a central question in that debate – should we enforce the law first, or should we legalize illegal immigrants and then begin to enforce the law vigorously. The president argues for the legalize-first-enforce-second approach, while the public generally favors enforcement first. In truth, any enforcement strategy will take years to implement, given the administrative, legal and political challenges it will face. If we ignore this fact and proceed with an amnesty before we have met these challenges, we will simply repeat the 1986 amnesty, which legalized nearly 3 million illegal immigrants who were then replaced by new illegal immigrants as enforcement languished.

The above is a press release from from Center for Immigration Studies. 1522 K St. NW, Suite 820, Washington, DC 20005, (202) 466-8185 fax: (202) 466-8076. Email: center@cis.org. The Center for Immigration Studies is an independent research institution which examines the impact of immigration on the United States. The Center for Immigration Studies is not affiliated with any other organization

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